Advisory board supporting the London Transport Authority in accessibility matters

Solution
Independent Disability Advisory Group
Organization
Transport for London Authority
Country of Implementation
United Kingdom
Region
Europe
Subregion
Western Europe
City
London
Start Year
2010
First published
16.01.2022

The Independent Disability Advisory Group advises Transport for London, the main provider of public transport in Londong, in identifying and addressing issues and barriers to accessing public transport. In 2020, the 10 members of the group acted as consultants on 53 projects, like reconstruction of train stations.

Two women, the one on the left is sitting in a wheelchair, are enjoying a ride on the London tube, conversing and laughing with eachother. The woman on the right is holding a red lollipop.
What real improvement of accessibility of an underground looks like

Solution details

People

James LEEWebsite
“IDAG's advice led to real improvements in the accessibility of new trains during our design process.” Dan Parsons, Project Manager, Transport-for-London

Since 2010, Transport for London (TfL), a local government body and part of the administration of the City of London, has had an Independent Disability Advisory Group (IDAG). IDAG has 10 paid members who have experience of different disabilities combined with professional expertise such as marketing, engineering, customer experience, equality and transport. They are not employees to ensure independence. IDAG advised on 53 projects in 2020 including ones relating to the pandemic.

Problems Targeted

It is difficult for most persons with disabilities to use public transportation due to physical barriers, untrained staff members, and a lack of accessibility services.

Solution, Innovation and Impact

IDAG is composed entirely of people who have been appointed for their lived experience of disability and extensive knowledge of key issues and barriers to accessing public transport, and who are consulted at regular meetings or on an ad-hoc basis when needed. The advisory group helps TfL to better understand the impact of its policies and programmes on customers with disabilities; and it evaluates strategies, policies, and services to highlight where and what change is needed to reduce barriers to travel. These barriers could be practical, such as lack of seating; psychological, such as feeling anxious; or attitudinal, such as the behaviour of TfL staff or other passengers. Examples of projects IDAG advised on in 2020 was support for disabled passengers travelling on buses and the underground during the pandemic, cashless stations, face covering exemptions, new design of train carriages, escalators, lifts, the redesign of streets in London to allow more space for people to socially distance and a trial of e-scooters. The success of this work is monitored in a number of ways; the overall accessibility of the built environment under TfL’s control, the impact of policies shaped by IDAG, and the feedback from the commuting public. There are also softer measures of success, such as the attitudes of the public and TfL staff.

Funding, Outlook and Transferability

TfL funds the work of IDAG, and its members are paid an industry-standard fee for their time spent on its projects. TfL does not employ the members so as to preserve their independence. The Diversity and Inclusion team at TfL provides administrative support to IDAG. In the next three to five years IDAG plans to continue working with TfL to improve public transportation access in London and hopes to reach out to other cities worldwide to replicate their approach.

Media

Pictures

Two women, the one on the left is sitting in a wheelchair, are enjoying a ride on the London tube, conversing and laughing with eachother. The woman on the right is holding a red lollipop. What real improvement of accessibility of an underground looks like

Videos

Related information

Connections
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Solutions with the same:

Country of Implementation

United Kingdom

Region of Implementation

Europe

City of Implementation

London