Innovative Policy 2016 on Inclusive education and ICT

Brazil’s billion dollar National Plan for Inclusive Education

Inclusive Education cannot be provided in a vacuum. Rather, it takes many forms of support, including physically accessible education infrastructures, school transport, assistive devices, knowledgeable teachers, and – importantly – cash support for deprived parents and their out-of-school children. In a comprehensive and ambitious manner, Brazil’s National Plan ‘Living without Limit’ addressed all these issues.

National Plan of Rights of Persons with Disabilities ‘Living without Limit’
Started:2011
Country/Region
of origin
Brazil
Responsible bodySecretariat for Human Rights of the Presidency and 15 federal ministries

IN BRIEF

The 2011 Brazilian National Plan of Rights of Persons with Disabilities ‘Living without Limit’ aimed to implement new initiatives and intensify existing policies for the benefit of persons with disabilities, addressing issues of education, health care, social inclusion, and accessibility measures. Implemented by 15 ministries, the various measures included accessible classrooms and transportation, access to technical training, the promotion of accessibility in higher education, bilingual education, as well as a Continuous Cash Benefit School Programme to help school’s locate out-of-school children with disabilities and to enrol them in school.In the four-year period of 2011 to 2014, the National Plan invested $1.9 billion (R$7.6 bilhões).

CONTEXT

Despite an overall increase in school enrolment in Ghana, some children continued to be left behind, particularly children with disabilities, who went either to segregated boarding schools or were not enrolled at all. In 2009, Inclusive Education was piloted in the Central, Greater Accra, and Eastern Region, and by 2011 it was implemented in 529 schools. To roll-out these activities, UNICEF, the Ghana Blind Union, and Inclusion Ghana commenced discussions with the Ghana Education Service, the Ministry of Education, and other stakeholders to develop a policy framework. The involvement of non-state actors was key to the policy’s adoption, along with an accompanying implementation plan.

13,360 new multifunctional classrooms meeting special education needs and 20 sign language courses were created.

13,360 new multifunctional classrooms meeting special education needs and 20 sign language courses were created.

INNOVATIVE ASPECTS

Interministerial collaboration
The Plan brings together various ministries in addition to the Ministry of Education to directly and indirectly improve access to mainstream education.

Stopping invisibility
The Continuous Cash Benefit School Programme is a particular good practice as it allows school staff to actively search for children who are out of school, assesses the situation of families, and provide them with the means to bring their children to school.

FACTS & FIGURES

  • 13,360 new multifunctional classrooms meeting special education needs and 20 sign language courses were created.
  • 40,316 schools improved their architectural accessibility and/or purchased materials and assistive technologies.
  • 2,304 accessible vehicles for school transport were purchased.
  • As of January 2015, 19,021 persons with disabilities have been given priority enrolment in professional education courses.
  • $37 million has been invested in goods and services, e.g., wheelchairs, Braille printers, etc.

«Living without Limit’, though a young programme, is a milestone for the political landscape of persons with disabilities at the federal level of Brazil.

Mr. Moisés Bauer, President, CONADE

KEY FEATURES

The Brazilian National Plan of Rights of Persons with Disabilities ‘Living without Limit’ of 2011 is a national legally-binding policy that covers four areas: access to education, health care, social inclusion, and accessibility. Measures in basic education include: accessible school infrastructure and equipment, teacher training, accessible school buses, and the Continuous Cash Benefit School Programme. In higher education, accessibility centres are established at higher education institutions. Measures on accessibility include: a National Programme for Innovation in Assistive Technology, a National Centre of Reference in Assistive Technology, and access to a credit line for the acquisition of assistive technology products. Measures and their targets are defined by a Steering Committee coordinated by the Secretariat for Human Rights, while a Joint Interministerial Group promotes coordination among ministries. Union budget allocations are earmarked each year.

OUTCOME, IMPACT, AND EFFECTIVENESS

  • Enrolment of children with disabilities in regular schools increased from 145,141 in 2003 (29%) to 698,768 in 2014 (79%).
  • In 2014 there were 103,473 regular schools with students with disabilities, and 84% of all public schools had students with disabilities enrolled (compared to 50% in 2003).
  • In 2012, 23,400 students with disabilities became new beneficiaries of the Continuous Cash Benefit, reaching 329,800 beneficiaries in total – 70% of whom are now in school.

TRANSFERABILITY, SCALABILITY, AND COST-EFFICIENCY

Brazil’s National Plan ‘Living without Limit’ of 2011 can be transferred to other countries that are interested in streamlining actions towards disability inclusion. Brazil presented at UNESCO’s 2015 conference in a session on “Inclusive Policies at the National Level.”

CONTACT

Mr. Antônio José DO NASCIMENTO FERREIRA
Secretariat of Human Rights of the Presidency of the Republic of Brazil
antonio.ferreira@sdh.gov.br
Ms. Martinha Clarete Dutra DOS SANTOS
Ministério da Educação, Brasilia, Brazil
MartinhaSantos@mec.gov.br
Prof. Dr. Geovana MENDES, Universidade Do Estado De Santa Catarina
Geolunardi@Gmail.Com

SOURCES

Media – UNICEF Ghana, 2014: http://www.unicef.org/ghana/media_8503.html
Efua Esaaba Mantey, Accessibility to inclusive education for children with disabilities, 2014: http://bit.ly/1ioOE5I

Nominated by: Ingrid HEINDORF, World Future Council